The Black Archive, a series of book-length looks at single Doctor Who stories from 1963 to the present day.

‘Is this honour? Is this war?’

 

Battlefield (1989) sees a clash of mythologies, as the progressive, anti-racist, sporadically pacifist Doctor Who of the late 1980s takes on Britain’s authoritarian, chivalric national myth of King Arthur. With a script by Ben Aaronovitch, now a bestselling urban fantasy novelist but then only the writer of the previous year’s acclaimed Remembrance of the Daleks (1988), it forms with its predecessor a ‘philosophical pair’, replacing its 1960s setting with an imagined 1990s and showing a Doctor dealing with the repercussions of his future actions, rather than his past.

 

Even as a script Battlefield falls short of complete success, yet it remains an emotionally literate, politically engaged and thematically complex piece. It finds areas of overlap between Andrew Cartmel’s radical conception of Doctor Who and Arthurian myth in the legend of a past golden age, represented by the return of Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart and UNIT, and in the identification of the Doctor – always presented by the series as a wizard, a prophet and a mentor – with Merlin. It interrogates the patriarchal attitudes of both the Arthurian myths and 1970s Doctor Who from a contemporary perspective, and questions the attitudes to war found in both.

 

It also does an exemplary job of worldbuilding, sketching in a convincing near future based on a handful of lines, and presents a complex, questionable, even sympathetic villain motivated by a value system alien to our own. Finally, it raises questions of predestination: through the other characters’ foreknowledge of the Doctor’s future; through the fate apparently decreed for Ancelyn and Bambera; and, perhaps, through the Brigadier’s survival of a story whose structure seems to demand that he should die.

 

‘After all, he does have an interesting story to tell.’

 

Most people watching Timelash (1985) these days are probably re-watching, and hold firmly to their opinions about this often maligned two-parter. But here are some questions to consider.

How do the ideas of HG Wells haunt Timelash? His socialism? His feminism? Do both Wells and Doctor Who fall short of their ideals in the same ways? How does power speak on

Karfel? Is the Borad a ventriloquist? Is the Borad vegan? Can idealism succeed in Doctor Who in an era script-edited by a profound cynic? And where have we seen that sofa before?

By asking fresh questions of Timelash, this Black Archive may allow new and old viewers to see the story in a different light – indeed, perhaps, as the most luminous force in this part of the galaxy.

Written by Phil Pascoe

The Black Archive, a series of book-length looks at single Doctor Who stories from 1963 to the present day

 

"What if the big bad Time Lord doesn’t want to admit he’s just afraid of the dark?"

 

Listen is a pared down episode of Doctor Who that draws on Freudian ideas to bring to life the fear felt by the characters on-screen and the watching viewers. This Black Archive examines how through its use of the supernatural, the Gothic, the unconscious mind, madness and dystopia, Listen really is the stuff of nightmares.

 

By Dewi Small

 

 

 

 

 

Black Archive 34: Battlefield

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